Rex (rapp81) wrote,
Rex
rapp81

Blogging according to The Contra Costa Times...

There's an article in today's paper about teens and blogging.  I found it to be pretty interesting, because I have come across some of the blogging rhetoric of some of today's high school students (mainly from the De La Salle / Carondelet ones via MySpace).  The article also talks about how the San Ramon Valley School District put a block on MySpace on its firewall, then took the block down.  (BTW, DLS's assistant principal is interviewed for this article)

At the end of the article, the times defines what a blog is and lists some of the popular blogging sites with some descriptions.  Honestly, I think the reporter could have done a better job describing LiveJournal!  I mean, she did describe Xanga right on the money!

A blog, or Web log, is an online diary or journal. They are posted at dozens of Web sites, each of which attracts specific teen audiences:

• MySpace: More of a social networking site a la Friendster and Tribe, MySpace is popular among teens who want to meet friends of friends, view photos and learn about
Indie or underground music.

• Xanga: Attracts a large Asian population.

• LiveJournal: With its long, introspective blogs, LiveJournal is big among the artsy or emo crowd (a genre of music that also describes the sensitive, introspective types
who listen to it).

• Blogger: Formerly Blogspot, the site has a feature called AudioBlogger, which lets you call Blogger from any phone and leave a message that is immediately posted to your site as an MP3 audio file. "Fun at parties," the site proclaims.

• Blurty: Like most sites, Blurty offers blog rings, or communities that blog on similar issues. The site's most popular rings: "emolyrics," "debatereligion" and "cutmeintopieces."


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